PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS TO LOOK MORE PRO AND LESS “EXCITED NOOB WITH A CAMERA”

Photography. I’m sure nobody could conceive just how important
photography would be.
Ever since that first photo, “View from the Window at Le Gras,” taken by
Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826 or 1867 (which is supposedly the world’s
first surviving photograph) cameras and photos have, well, evolved.
Evolved dramatically, at that. From camera obscuras to the Canon EOS
Rebel SL3 or even your iPhone camera, we have come a long way.
And as a photographer, whether just for fun or as career, you want to
keep evolving too.
Know exactly how to take the best photos, so you can focus more on getting your idea, message, or “artistic expression” (ahem “my photos aren’t bad! They are just artistic!”) across without constantly worrying if your “iso is making” your photo “grainy”. Maybe just blame that one on the lighting, it’s not your lack of skill, definitely not.
Without further ado, here are the best tips I have scavenged from the
deepest crevices of the web and a few photography books excerpts I still
have engrained in my noggin, that will hopefully make you and your
photos look more “pro” and less “exited noob with a camera”.
There are only 6 tips here. But I promise you there are many more. But
the best way to learn is to just go and take bad photos, then take less bad
photos, then hopefully, take a photo that doesn’t make your course
instructor go “I need another coffee to deal with you”.

1) Know thine camera. Know thine basics.
Get to know your new friend. Don’t dive into this relationship without properly knowing how your camera works, what all those little funny
buttons are for, how to give it TLC and make sure you don’t set it on fire.
Learn all the basics, your ISO, shutter speed, aperture, white balance,
frame rate. If you don’t bother to memorize these and engrain them into your brain, I’m not getting you any coffee.

2) Learn all the rules. Break them when you need to.
What is the difference between a photo that looks like it was taken by
someone who has never held a camera and let’s say, Art Wolfe, is that he
knows the rules. He breaks them when he needs to, to create an effect.
Now don’t go and snap an ugly, badly composed photo and tell everyone
it’s artistic.
It’s not artistic. It’s just a bad photo.
3) Master your focal point.
Ask yourself what you want someone to focus on. Make sure it is the
focus.
No that doesn’t mean you need to put your subject smack-dab in the middle of the frame and string fairy lights around his neck. Like I said,
learn the rules. It makes everyone a lot happier.
(The rule of thirds exists for a reason. Unless you want your photo to
deliberately break that, it’s always a good idea to fall on it.)

4) Don’t go automatic. Unless you want to automatically
become a loser.
Want to become the most disowned photographer instantly? Just turn on
automatic mode.
Trust me, works every time.
If you don’t, however, maybe just glue the button set to manual. Thank
me later when your colleagues are giving you flower crowns and cupcakes
because you’re so amazing.

5) Create depth.
No, I don’t mean “the red dress symbolizes his internal anger for Vogue” I
mean depth of field.
You don’t want your photo looking flat. Well, unless you do. But usually,
you don’t.
The best way to convey depth is to include some elements in the foreground, middle ground, and background. And make use of your aperture, duh.

6) Good lighting will save your soul. Bad lighting will, well it
won’t.
Yes, editing exists. Photoshop is amazing. But don’t snap a photo with the intent of “I can fix it up later”. Make sure your lighting is good. If it’s not ideal, see how you can alter your environment. If you can’t see if you can alter your aperture. Don’t bump up your iso unless you must. Which you don’t. Please don’t do that.